CBT and general bike tinkering

CBT and general bike tinkering

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Discussion

fred bloggs

463 posts

156 months

Saturday 30th May
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V8RX7 said:
ebay at least anything needing work is currently selling for almost the same as a non damaged one.
And there you have it. Just buy a nice example of the bike you want,and spend time cleaning it.

arcticGT

929 posts

168 months

Saturday 30th May
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Theories have been pushed back to June 21st earliest now (emergency tests can be applied for if your a key worker)

Pete-mojsh

Original Poster:

190 posts

52 months

Saturday 30th May
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arcticGT said:
Theories have been pushed back to June 21st earliest now (emergency tests can be applied for if your a key worker)
That's a shame, would like to get that done but cbt isn't until next weekend anyway, perfectly understandable though. If I can take a few lessons on a 600 prior to getting a date for the theory that should set me up for mod 1 & 2.



ruprechtmonkeyboy

851 posts

43 months

Sunday 31st May
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arcticGT said:
Theories have been pushed back to June 21st earliest now (emergency tests can be applied for if your a key worker)
Mine is booked for the 19th June in Watford so some centres must be opening earlier.

Pete-mojsh

Original Poster:

190 posts

52 months

Sunday 31st May
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ruprechtmonkeyboy said:
Mine is booked for the 19th June in Watford so some centres must be opening earlier.
When did you book yours? Watford is half an hour from me so quite easy to get to.

ruprechtmonkeyboy

851 posts

43 months

Sunday 31st May
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Pete-mojsh said:
ruprechtmonkeyboy said:
Mine is booked for the 19th June in Watford so some centres must be opening earlier.
When did you book yours? Watford is half an hour from me so quite easy to get to.
I booked it back on the 4th May.

arcticGT

929 posts

168 months

Sunday 31st May
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Hopefully the situation changes by then but at the time of your booking they were expecting to be open again 1st June. Someone I know was booked for the 1st June and this has just been cancelled Thursday. Website has been updated to 21st June now.

Markgenesis

389 posts

88 months

Sunday 31st May
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zzrman said:
crofty1984 said:
Do a CBT and if you like it buy a second hand Japanese 125 to play with. Tinker with it for a year/6 months learn to ride it WELL then look at direct access and whatever bike you fancy.
Riding a 125 for 6 months to a year is likely to put you off biking, when your overtaking is limited to bicycles and little old ladies.

Pass the CBT and DAS and get yourself advanced training immediately afterwards.
This 100%, even doing the CBT nearly put me off as I found it a long day and the bike was a pretty knackered 12 year old YB125, luckily I stuck with it, moved to the bigger bike (650 Gladius) and started to enjoy the weekly two hour lessons, did my CBT in August last year, nearly bought a 125 to practice on, glad I didn't, passed my Mod 2 in February this year, bought a 2004 GSXR 600 and have a Kawasaki Vulcan 1500 project, at 49 I wish i'd done it years ago.

Bumblebee7

1,013 posts

31 months

Monday 1st June
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Just for the sake of balance thought I'd mention I did CBT, bought a 125cc and pootled about on it for a year racking up 6,000 miles. I really liked the 125, and really learned how to eek the most out of it, retaining momentum through corners etc. After about 9-10 months on that I did my DAS, which was an absolute breeze as I'd gained so much experience on the 125. I then rode the 125 for a few more months until I'd saved enough to buy a bigger bike and got myself an NC750X which although much heavier is a much nicer bike in every respect.

I really don't think there's a wrong way to do it, but I'm happy I started small and light, working my way up as I gained experience.

Bungleaio

5,644 posts

158 months

Monday 1st June
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zzrman said:
crofty1984 said:
Do a CBT and if you like it buy a second hand Japanese 125 to play with. Tinker with it for a year/6 months learn to ride it WELL then look at direct access and whatever bike you fancy.
Riding a 125 for 6 months to a year is likely to put you off biking, when your overtaking is limited to bicycles and little old ladies.

Pass the CBT and DAS and get yourself advanced training immediately afterwards.
I would advocate advanced training but not straight after DAS. Get some miles in for a year and learn how to use the clutch, gears etc without needing to think about then do advanced.

Enjoy the experience of learning to ride. I loved it and can't imagine not having a bike now.

ruprechtmonkeyboy

851 posts

43 months

Tuesday 2nd June
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Bumblebee7 said:
Just for the sake of balance thought I'd mention I did CBT, bought a 125cc and pootled about on it for a year racking up 6,000 miles. I really liked the 125, and really learned how to eek the most out of it, retaining momentum through corners etc. After about 9-10 months on that I did my DAS, which was an absolute breeze as I'd gained so much experience on the 125. I then rode the 125 for a few more months until I'd saved enough to buy a bigger bike and got myself an NC750X which although much heavier is a much nicer bike in every respect.

I really don't think there's a wrong way to do it, but I'm happy I started small and light, working my way up as I gained experience.
I'm doing very similar. I've got an old GSXR 600 SRAD that I've been fixing up as a project and plan was to get my test out of the way earlier this year. Had everything booked up and then the lockdown came along.

So as my lessons have stopped for the foreseeable I decided to buy an old YBR125 to practice on. Having the time to go to a car park and practice u turns, etc is proving invaluable plus the experience of being out and about getting used to riding by myself. Should put me in a good place for getting my test passed!

Pete-mojsh

Original Poster:

190 posts

52 months

Tuesday 2nd June
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Well, cbt is on sunday, decent chance of rain so should be an experience.

I think the way the year is going it's likely a DAS will be pushed back a bit, probably just in time for the weather to turn but could allow for a winter project to keep me amused. I've also got a new car coming on the next week that I used the man maths for so will need a few more months and to get past the family holiday to free up enough cash. This is also on the assumption that we get to go away, it's been moved once already and there is no guarantee Cyprus will be wanting to accept people from the worst performing country in Europe on to their shores.

Pete-mojsh

Original Poster:

190 posts

52 months

Tuesday 2nd June
quotequote all
ruprechtmonkeyboy said:
I'm doing very similar. I've got an old GSXR 600 SRAD that I've been fixing up as a project and plan was to get my test out of the way earlier this year. Had everything booked up and then the lockdown came along.

So as my lessons have stopped for the foreseeable I decided to buy an old YBR125 to practice on. Having the time to go to a car park and practice u turns, etc is proving invaluable plus the experience of being out and about getting used to riding by myself. Should put me in a good place for getting my test passed!
I'm quite interested in hearing more about the srad, it's one I have looked at.

TooLateForAName

4,084 posts

140 months

Tuesday 2nd June
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on youtube, roadcraft nottingham seems good. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7cTUIwR1FuvMplHd...

Also reg-local on here is now doing bikes. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8fDyubAs3eLup-3C...

GreaseNipple

229 posts

197 months

Tuesday 2nd June
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I was like you in that I wanted to do my CBT to see if I liked bikes and wanted to do my test. I would say don't go just on your CBT. I found mine rushed and that I wasnt really ready for the road ride, I was doing it with a 16 year old girl on a 50cc moped so there was a lot of teaching her basic road stuff. She was struggling to get past 25mph and I was being told to wait for her all the time. At the end of the day I hadnt enjoyed it and didn't have much desire to do anything more about it. Because of lockdown and the cancellation of tests I was stuck on 125s if I wanted to contiune riding so I bought one and have enjoyed the quiet roads getting used to it, it took quite a few rides to feel comfortable and now I think I will do my test but going at my own speed and being able to go to car parks and quiet roads has played a big part in my enjoyment so I'd say 125s arent as bad as some make out.

ruprechtmonkeyboy

851 posts

43 months

Tuesday 2nd June
quotequote all
Pete-mojsh said:
ruprechtmonkeyboy said:
I'm doing very similar. I've got an old GSXR 600 SRAD that I've been fixing up as a project and plan was to get my test out of the way earlier this year. Had everything booked up and then the lockdown came along.

So as my lessons have stopped for the foreseeable I decided to buy an old YBR125 to practice on. Having the time to go to a car park and practice u turns, etc is proving invaluable plus the experience of being out and about getting used to riding by myself. Should put me in a good place for getting my test passed!
I'm quite interested in hearing more about the srad, it's one I have looked at.
I've wanted one since they were new and it's scary to think that's over 20 years ago now! I bought mine last year (1998 model, in blue and white of course) with an engine fault. So far I have replaced the engine (more daunting than it sounds, the workshop manual is a free download) and various other bits including having the callipers rebuilt, etc. I've also removed the tat previous owners have fitted like tiny indicators and a matt black screen that you couldn't even see through. The bike is now stock apart from a Quill can I have fitted that sounds amazing. The only thing really left to do is get the front forks serviced as one leaks a bit of oil, then MOT time smile

They are easy bikes to work on and there are tons of parts available cheaply due to the sheer amount being broken. It's amazing how well these things were built in the first place as I haven't encountered any stuck fasteners or broken screws, etc. You don't really see any 90s sports bikes about any more so it's certainly something different and probably considered a classic these days!


ruprechtmonkeyboy

851 posts

43 months

Tuesday 2nd June
quotequote all
GreaseNipple said:
I was like you in that I wanted to do my CBT to see if I liked bikes and wanted to do my test. I would say don't go just on your CBT. I found mine rushed and that I wasnt really ready for the road ride, I was doing it with a 16 year old girl on a 50cc moped so there was a lot of teaching her basic road stuff. She was struggling to get past 25mph and I was being told to wait for her all the time. At the end of the day I hadnt enjoyed it and didn't have much desire to do anything more about it. Because of lockdown and the cancellation of tests I was stuck on 125s if I wanted to contiune riding so I bought one and have enjoyed the quiet roads getting used to it, it took quite a few rides to feel comfortable and now I think I will do my test but going at my own speed and being able to go to car parks and quiet roads has played a big part in my enjoyment so I'd say 125s arent as bad as some make out.
I'd actually started lessons on a 600 so a step ahead of you. I found it a bit tricky learning to ride a bike whilst also dealing with instructions from the instructor at the same time, there is so much to take in. I live in Hertfordshire and the Mod 1 test is in Enfield about 30 mins ride plus the Mod 2 is over in Uxbridge about 45 mins so practicing on the 125 I have bought should hopefully help preparing me a bit more. Would be a bit of faff to keep having to travel to retake tests.

Pete-mojsh

Original Poster:

190 posts

52 months

Tuesday 2nd June
quotequote all
ruprechtmonkeyboy said:
They are easy bikes to work on and there are tons of parts available cheaply due to the sheer amount being broken. It's amazing how well these things were built in the first place as I haven't encountered any stuck fasteners or broken screws, etc. You don't really see any 90s sports bikes about any more so it's certainly something different and probably considered a classic these days!
That's kind of reassuring, I spent a lot of my 20's working on french cars that had their quirks and iffy build quality so something relatively hassle free would be a bonus, especially as although mechanically minded I haven't tried before. Still, it's good to learn new things. My wife might see things differently but she knew what she was getting in to when she married me.

As someone who can get quite focused when I have an idea in my head it may be a bit frustrating with the delays due to covid and our relatively short season of decent weather, but there are many bigger things going on in the world at the moment so if I have to wait until next year to get everything on place then so be it.

Jag_NE

2,236 posts

56 months

Tuesday 2nd June
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My 2 cents:

Don’t use the cbt as the gauge for whether biking is for you. It’s a pretty rushed affair and not much fun.
Think more about getting lessons under your belt, theory test swotting etc versus dreaming about bikes. Realistically a mod2 pass is months away.
Don’t waste your time with 125’s at your stage of life.
When you pass you will be wanting to ride the bike as much as possible. I’d buy the best you can to avoid being frustrated with chronic niggles. Something Jap and as new/low miles as poss versus a snorter project.
I’d recommend something on the lighter side, I nearly dropped my bike 3 times in the months after passing and i had to use every ounce of my strength to keep it up. A bit more weight / bit less strength would have seen it on the deck.

Good luck.

Donbot

1,330 posts

83 months

Tuesday 2nd June
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Nowt wrong with 125s, whether you think they are st or not depends on what you want from riding.