Traditional Morgan production to cease...

Traditional Morgan production to cease...

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Discussion

Shezbo

Original Poster:

405 posts

90 months

Monday 6th January
quotequote all
With the new CX chassis the old "trad" had to die sometime I guess??

NEWS: In yet another significant announcement for our 110th year, we are excited to reveal that new models on our CX-Generation aluminium platform will be launched in 2020. New models will feature smaller engines than the 3.0 litre inline six cylinder found in the Plus Six, and we can confirm that there will be a manual transmission within the range.

The introduction of these new models will mark the end of Morgan using the traditional steel frame chassis, a variation of which has featured in Morgan models since 1936. We look forward to celebrating the significance of the traditional steel frame chassis as the final models roll off the production line in 2020.

As we continue to create Morgan sports cars for the 21st century, the introduction of the CX-Generation aluminium platform across our core range is hugely exciting.

Autocar article: https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry/morgan...

cardigankid

8,500 posts

172 months

Friday 10th January
quotequote all
We can only wait and see what the next generation will be like, once the manual gearbox arrives. An automatic Morgan, to my mind, is a contradiction.

It’s a quantum leap, not gradual development, and who knows if it is going to be successful. What seems logical is that the cars are going to get more expensive, and will have to pass the safety standards for more and bigger markets.

Might be brilliant.

Edited by cardigankid on Friday 10th January 21:55

cardigankid

8,500 posts

172 months

Wednesday 29th January
quotequote all
Or alternatively it might not.

On the one hand, there have been criticism of the traditional Morgan chassis, the cars have to meet safety standards in key markets including the USA, and the price has to reflect a handbuilt car.

On the other, when I was discussing buying a Morgan, one of the points made was that it is a vintage car, built today. From here on it won't be, and the use of the automatic gearbox is anathema.


maxmeabh

6 posts

110 months

Wednesday 12th February
quotequote all
I think that the new P4 will have a manual gearbox with six speeds and will also be able to be specced with wire wheels. Not long before Geneva.

Jon39

7,542 posts

103 months

Saturday 4th April
quotequote all

What does CX stand for?

Aston Martin eventually came to regret naming their alloy chassis system. It was called VH architecture, when it was introduced in the early 2000s. A bonded system of alloy components, not dissimilar to the Lotus design at the time.

If it had not been given a name, then they would have avoided the subsequent criticism from journalists. By about 2015, motoring journalists kept referring to the 'old fashioned VH chassis'. Ironically it was about then, 10 years later, that many motor manufacturers started to introduce an alloy chassis.

Aston Martin no longer use a name for their chassis.





craigjm

11,082 posts

160 months

Saturday 4th April
quotequote all
Jon39 said:


Aston Martin no longer use a name for their chassis.
Of course they do. Everything has internal codes for identification

Fat Wolfie

103 posts

27 months

Sunday 5th April
quotequote all
CX = 110 in Roman numerals.

First car using the new platform (Plus 6) launched in 2019, which was Morgan’s 110 th year of production.

They made a big thing of the anniversary with a number of 110 editions* of the traditional cars being released


  • of which I have one biggrin

Wacky Racer

33,688 posts

207 months

Sunday 5th April
quotequote all
I've owned two new traditional Morgans and would have no problem with an automatic, in fact I would prefer it.

My last Plus 4.



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Jon39

7,542 posts

103 months

Sunday 5th April
quotequote all

craigjm said:
Jon39 said:

Aston Martin no longer use a name for their chassis.
Of course they do. Everything has internal codes for identification

Are Morgan owners always abrupt?

In case you missed my point. In the early 2000s (DB9 and Vantage), the VH name of the new alloy platform was 'shouted from the rooftops'.

The first of the replacement models, DB11, has a similar component all-alloy 'chassis', but it was publicly announced simply as having, 'an all-new alloy chassis'. No public name was used, probably because of the previous perceived negative views of journalists.




craigjm

11,082 posts

160 months

Sunday 5th April
quotequote all
Jon39 said:

craigjm said:
Jon39 said:

Aston Martin no longer use a name for their chassis.
Of course they do. Everything has internal codes for identification

Are Morgan owners always abrupt?

In case you missed my point. In the early 2000s (DB9 and Vantage), the VH name of the new alloy platform was 'shouted from the rooftops'.

The first of the replacement models, DB11, has a similar component all-alloy 'chassis', but it was publicly announced simply as having, 'an all-new alloy chassis'. No public name was used, probably because of the previous perceived negative views of journalists.
No I did not miss your point.