Cheese again !

Author
Discussion

Cactussed

5,195 posts

165 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
quotequote all
smack said:
I got given one of those black waxed beauties a few weeks back and it was lick
We're still talking cheese, right?

smack

9,371 posts

143 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
quotequote all
Cactussed said:
smack said:
I got given one of those black waxed beauties a few weeks back and it was lick
We're still talking cheese, right?
errr, yeah....
paperbag

SirClarke

633 posts

128 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
quotequote all
bishbash said:
My current fave is Manchego, a Spanish Sheep's milk cheese, quite a rich flavour, but bloody lovely.
Just a note on this as manchego is an absolute favourite of mine but I've yet to find any major supermarket which actually sells a decent quality manchego. I used to buy it from a Bristol shop called Fresh and Wild (sadly now closed) which had a fantastic 12 month cave aged version. Really dry and almost crystalline. Supermarket versions tend to be far too young and a bit mild and rubbery.

jessica

6,316 posts

204 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
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Shaw Tarse said:
I need to try Epoisses wink
I did this last week. Bought from the reduced bin in Sainsburys. 50p down from £4.10.
It was just perfectly runny for eating with a spoon. Smells very strong. but tastes divine.........

$nake eye$

411 posts

154 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
quotequote all
Stinking Bishop is worth a try !

lady topaz

Original Poster:

3,852 posts

206 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
quotequote all
Some great tips guys. Glad to see some other cheese enthusiasts. Now just need some wine tips to go with them.!!!!

Alfa_75_Steve

7,489 posts

152 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
quotequote all
lady topaz said:
Some great tips guys. Glad to see some other cheese enthusiasts. Now just need some wine tips to go with them.!!!!
Nuits Saint Georges. Preferably Premier Cru.

lingus75

1,606 posts

174 months

Wednesday 5th August 2009
quotequote all
HRG. said:
Cheesy peas...
Muta Paneer. It was always a let down.....

Mobile Chicane

19,158 posts

164 months

Thursday 6th August 2009
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lady topaz said:
Some great tips guys. Glad to see some other cheese enthusiasts. Now just need some wine tips to go with them.!!!!
I'm a great believer that the cheese and alcohol of a region go well together:

Epoisses and Nuits St Georges
Brie and cider
Manchego and sherry
Roquefort and Cahors

etc, etc lick

Mark-C

3,194 posts

157 months

Thursday 6th August 2009
quotequote all
Particularly enjoying Gjetost at the moment - Norwegian with a fudge-like texture and colour and a stunning caramel flavour. Not sure what drink goes best with it - I drink red wine with everything

I buy mine from the cheese shop (can't remember the name) on Liverpool Street station - at the end furthest from Bishopsgate. Friendly and knowledgeable staff.

robbin'b

115 posts

161 months

Thursday 6th August 2009
quotequote all
If you want a real stinker try : http://www.chabichou-du-poitou.eu/

I last saw this in the UK at Hudson's Tea Rooms in Birmingham a long, long time ago.

Used to get it from Figeac when in France - getting it home without the car smelling for weeks of old goat was an interesting challenge...

Rob

shakotan

10,400 posts

148 months

Friday 7th August 2009
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Mobile Chicane said:
lady topaz said:
Some great tips guys. Glad to see some other cheese enthusiasts. Now just need some wine tips to go with them.!!!!
I'm a great believer that the cheese and alcohol of a region go well together:

Brie and cider
Because Brie comes from the West Country, of course!?

Mobile Chicane

19,158 posts

164 months

Friday 7th August 2009
quotequote all
shakotan said:
Mobile Chicane said:
lady topaz said:
Some great tips guys. Glad to see some other cheese enthusiasts. Now just need some wine tips to go with them.!!!!
I'm a great believer that the cheese and alcohol of a region go well together:

Brie and cider
Because Brie comes from the West Country, of course!?
Though West Country 'brie' and Normandy cider could also work wink

Mark Benson

5,500 posts

221 months

Friday 7th August 2009
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We've just started getting cheese from Shepherd's Purse - http://www.shepherdspurse.co.uk/index.pl

She's won a world cheese award with her Yorkshire Blue cheese, which is similar to dolcelatte.

And try Basilano with pasta, tomatoes, basil and good olive oil, it's absolutely delicious.

VTECMatt

855 posts

190 months

Friday 7th August 2009
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This is our Cheese list at present, my personal favourite is the Finn and Lord of the Hundreds.

Ashmore: a naturally rinded, hard farmhouse cheese made in Canterbury using unpasteurised cow’s milk. Has a deep earthy flavour with a creamy texture

Flower Marie: ripened unpasteurised sheep’s milk cheese with white bloomy rind made at Golden Cross Dairy, East Sussex. Delicate, creamy flavour and soft texture

Broad Oak Cheddar: made using unpasteurised cow’s milk in Stonegate, East Sussex, the cheese is bound in double muslin and matured for minimum of 9 months. Has a clean, sharp edged flavour

Dorstone: moist, fluffy textured goat’s milk cheese with an ash coating. From Neal’s Yard Creamery, Herefordshire

Colston Bassett Stilton: hugely regarded blue stilton made in nottingham using pasteurised cow’s milk – it’s smooth & creamy with distinctive blue veins that contribute deep and complex flavours

Lord of the Hundreds: unique unpressed cheese made from unpasteurised ewe’s milk. The flavour hints of caramelised hazelnuts and has a delightfully natural sweet and savoury balance. Made in Stonegate, East Sussex

finn organic: a rich & densely textured semi-soft unpasteurised cow’s milk cheese from the golden valley, Herefordshire


Edited by VTECMatt on Friday 7th August 22:20

grumbledoak

25,166 posts

185 months

Friday 7th August 2009
quotequote all
lazyitus said:
Try a bit of Austrian Smoked.
Just to add, the supermarket versions are rather rubbery. They won't blow you away on bread or crackers. Nothing like most of the others mentioned here.

But, they make a divine filling for a Saturday morning omelette - slice probably half of a 'sausage' up and lay a stripe of it down the middle halfway through the cooking time, then fold into three at the end. Just add some steamed green vegetables (asparagus/brocolli, etc) on the side for balance. yum

Anna_S

1,473 posts

164 months

Tuesday 18th August 2009
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Hooray, one of the girls at work's just come back from France and brought me a Pont-l'Évêque bounce

SirClarke

633 posts

128 months

Tuesday 18th August 2009
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shakotan said:
Mobile Chicane said:
lady topaz said:
Some great tips guys. Glad to see some other cheese enthusiasts. Now just need some wine tips to go with them.!!!!
I'm a great believer that the cheese and alcohol of a region go well together:

Brie and cider
Because Brie comes from the West Country, of course!?
I personally think a good Somerset brie is actually a much nicer cheese than any French brie de maux.

And it does indeed go well with cider smile

zakelwe

4,449 posts

150 months

Tuesday 18th August 2009
quotequote all
Forgetting strength would it be accurate to class all cheeses into 3 types

1) Creamy = brie
2) Salty = Stilton
3) Buttery = ewes cheese of various types

Although I hate crap supermarket plastic cheese they do I love cheese singles. I know, that is really sad.

Regards
Andy

Mark-C

3,194 posts

157 months

Tuesday 18th August 2009
quotequote all
zakelwe said:
Forgetting strength would it be accurate to class all cheeses into 3 types

1) Creamy = brie
2) Salty = Stilton
3) Buttery = ewes cheese of various types

Although I hate crap supermarket plastic cheese they do I love cheese singles. I know, that is really sad.

Regards
Andy
I'm with you ... nothing better than a Kraft slice sat betwixt muffin and poached egg

Edited to spell "nothing" properly .... shouldn't really be difficult.

Edited by Mark-C on Tuesday 18th August 14:05