Warning POSSIBLE Tesco 99 Poor fuel problem

Warning POSSIBLE Tesco 99 Poor fuel problem

Author
Discussion

mcford

819 posts

141 months

Sunday 29th November 2009
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Sounds coincidental to me, I wouldn't be surprised if a coil pack is failing.

sjn2004

4,051 posts

204 months

Monday 30th November 2009
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kambites said:
TheEnd said:
Andyuk911 said:
kambites said:
Frankly, if your car goes into a "limp home" type mode without recording a fault, it's broken. No piece of electronics should actively enter a diagnostics mode without recording the reason. If the fuel was bad and there was nothing wrong with the car, it would have recorded that it was having some kind of combustion problem, probably a misfire or overheating or something.
No over heating or misfire ....
Don't take it the wrong way, the point is "limp home" is a specific emergency mode activated by the ecu, activated with the engine management light, and it will be recorded. What you will have had is rough running or another problem which pulls the power down, and it wasn't the ecu doing this for safety, in fact, it would seem that the ecu is currently unaware of any problems.
That sounds much more likely. I have never heard of a car entering its fail-safe mode without recording a fault. That would be a very odd firmware bug. However a modern ECU ought to detect anything with is having a effect on the engine's power output.

Edited by kambites on Saturday 28th November 19:49
Test drove a CLS500 last year, the car went into "limp home mode" twice on the test drive. Called the garage the day after to see what the fault was, they said the "computer" said nothing was wrong with the car...

clarkey318is

2,220 posts

141 months

Monday 30th November 2009
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foz01 said:
clarkey318is said:
Could be that you ran the tank very low before filling up? If this happened the pump will have picked up all the crud from the bottom of the tank.
biggest misconception out there.....
Would be useful if you could explain why, I'm not disagreeing with you but in my experience running a tank very low is never good for the pump, for starters it is where it is to aid cooling, if the tank is low then it is more prone to overheating. Not to mention the fact that particles of st are more concentrated when there is less fuel. I'd be interested to know why you think otherwise.

malaccamax

930 posts

198 months

Monday 30th November 2009
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Any update on this OP? I need closure!

bazking69

8,620 posts

157 months

Monday 30th November 2009
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Why on earth are you running a 1.2 on super for starters...

Pints

18,442 posts

161 months

Monday 30th November 2009
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Has the OP had them check the Throttle Control Unit?

Just a thought as that's what sent my Clio into limp mode.

snoopstah

391 posts

190 months

Monday 30th November 2009
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Is the OP posting from a Sainsbury's-owned IP address? wink

Marf

22,907 posts

208 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
clarkey318is said:
foz01 said:
clarkey318is said:
Could be that you ran the tank very low before filling up? If this happened the pump will have picked up all the crud from the bottom of the tank.
biggest misconception out there.....
Would be useful if you could explain why, I'm not disagreeing with you but in my experience running a tank very low is never good for the pump, for starters it is where it is to aid cooling, if the tank is low then it is more prone to overheating. Not to mention the fact that particles of st are more concentrated when there is less fuel. I'd be interested to know why you think otherwise.
A few questions:-

How did the crud get there in the first place?

Wouldn't any cars fuel system pick up crud as a matter of course given they pick up fuel from the lowest point in the tank?

What is a fuel filter for?

Pkh72

1,517 posts

153 months

Monday 30th November 2009
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bazking69 said:
Why on earth are you running a 1.2 on super for starters...
He said earlier in the thread that he was using it in part because of the better detergents and additives etc in the fuel, which i can't find fault with TBH.

Marf

22,907 posts

208 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
Pkh72 said:
bazking69 said:
Why on earth are you running a 1.2 on super for starters...
He said earlier in the thread that he was using it in part because of the better detergents and additives etc in the fuel, which i can't find fault with TBH.
Not to mention its a turbocharged car with the ability to adjust timing/boost to suit the octane of the fuel its being fed.

Andyuk911

Original Poster:

1,959 posts

176 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
bazking69 said:
Why on earth are you running a 1.2 on super for starters...
You clearly have very little knowledge about engines and fuel ....

Andyuk911

Original Poster:

1,959 posts

176 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
Marf said:
clarkey318is said:
foz01 said:
clarkey318is said:
Could be that you ran the tank very low before filling up? If this happened the pump will have picked up all the crud from the bottom of the tank.
biggest misconception out there.....
Would be useful if you could explain why, I'm not disagreeing with you but in my experience running a tank very low is never good for the pump, for starters it is where it is to aid cooling, if the tank is low then it is more prone to overheating. Not to mention the fact that particles of st are more concentrated when there is less fuel. I'd be interested to know why you think otherwise.
A few questions:-

How did the crud get there in the first place?

Wouldn't any cars fuel system pick up crud as a matter of course given they pick up fuel from the lowest point in the tank?

What is a fuel filter for?
Marf,

As you can see peoples level of knowledge of cars is amazingly poor.


Marf

22,907 posts

208 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
Andyuk911 said:
Marf said:
clarkey318is said:
foz01 said:
clarkey318is said:
Could be that you ran the tank very low before filling up? If this happened the pump will have picked up all the crud from the bottom of the tank.
biggest misconception out there.....
Would be useful if you could explain why, I'm not disagreeing with you but in my experience running a tank very low is never good for the pump, for starters it is where it is to aid cooling, if the tank is low then it is more prone to overheating. Not to mention the fact that particles of st are more concentrated when there is less fuel. I'd be interested to know why you think otherwise.
A few questions:-

How did the crud get there in the first place?

Wouldn't any cars fuel system pick up crud as a matter of course given they pick up fuel from the lowest point in the tank?

What is a fuel filter for?
Marf,

As you can see peoples level of knowledge of cars is amazingly poor.
Indeed, it never ceases to amaze me how these kinds of fallacies fall into automotive folk lore.

Howitzer

2,739 posts

183 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
Marf said:
Andyuk911 said:
Marf said:
clarkey318is said:
foz01 said:
clarkey318is said:
Could be that you ran the tank very low before filling up? If this happened the pump will have picked up all the crud from the bottom of the tank.
biggest misconception out there.....
Would be useful if you could explain why, I'm not disagreeing with you but in my experience running a tank very low is never good for the pump, for starters it is where it is to aid cooling, if the tank is low then it is more prone to overheating. Not to mention the fact that particles of st are more concentrated when there is less fuel. I'd be interested to know why you think otherwise.
A few questions:-

How did the crud get there in the first place?

Wouldn't any cars fuel system pick up crud as a matter of course given they pick up fuel from the lowest point in the tank?

What is a fuel filter for?
Marf,

As you can see peoples level of knowledge of cars is amazingly poor.
Indeed, it never ceases to amaze me how these kinds of fallacies fall into automotive folk lore.
We used to see it on tractors, I had it occur twice on the same car in my youth, when I could only afford £10 a time.

As has been said it's the concentration levels. I've pulled apart fuel systems that have run for years and upon opening them up still seen debris.

Dave!

Andyuk911

Original Poster:

1,959 posts

176 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
Just to update for the people who do understand.

I have spoken to Greenenergy who were extremely helpful.

They are going to investigate to check if any problems during the delivery of the fuel..

The gentleman did explain they can have very occasional issues.

I am currently unable to get any of my local Renault dealers to check and drain the tank as they are all booked until Thursday... and I need to use the car.

So I plan to run the tank out and refill with shell/BP.


anonymous-user

21 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
BlueMR2 said:
My last cars engine went pop on Tesco 99. The only other car to do the same thing we knew of at the time was also running Tesco 99.

The ingredients used to make it 99 are not appreciated by especially some older engines so if you run an older car with it make sure it wont damage it first.

I went back to Shell after that and have never used Tesco fuel in my cars since. My Dad uses the normal 95 ron from Tesco all the time though especially with 5p a litre off. I wouldn't use Tescos 99 again though only V Power.
Sorry, but your car's engine blew due to Tesco's petrol? I don't mean to be funny but I think it's more likely you engine had some sort of internal problems prior to you filling up.

Pkh72

1,517 posts

153 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
I've filled my ST up with Tesco 99 for the past couple of weeks without any issues so far (touching wood) so if it is a bad batch of fuel it could be regional like last time, although i haven't heard anything about anybody else having issues.
It does seem to run a bit sharper on V power though.

Edited by Pkh72 on Monday 30th November 14:23

Andyuk911

Original Poster:

1,959 posts

176 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
Howitzer said:
Marf said:
Andyuk911 said:
Marf said:
clarkey318is said:
foz01 said:
clarkey318is said:
Could be that you ran the tank very low before filling up? If this happened the pump will have picked up all the crud from the bottom of the tank.
biggest misconception out there.....
Would be useful if you could explain why, I'm not disagreeing with you but in my experience running a tank very low is never good for the pump, for starters it is where it is to aid cooling, if the tank is low then it is more prone to overheating. Not to mention the fact that particles of st are more concentrated when there is less fuel. I'd be interested to know why you think otherwise.
A few questions:-

How did the crud get there in the first place?

Wouldn't any cars fuel system pick up crud as a matter of course given they pick up fuel from the lowest point in the tank?

What is a fuel filter for?
Marf,

As you can see peoples level of knowledge of cars is amazingly poor.
Indeed, it never ceases to amaze me how these kinds of fallacies fall into automotive folk lore.
We used to see it on tractors, I had it occur twice on the same car in my youth, when I could only afford £10 a time.

As has been said it's the concentration levels. I've pulled apart fuel systems that have run for years and upon opening them up still seen debris.

Dave!
Sorry Dave, but we are talking about a year old car which has modern filters and an ECU ....

The Wookie

12,662 posts

195 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
I wouldn't expect it to be a problem with the specific fuel batch or mixture. More likely water in the fuel from a leaking, rusty old petrol station tank, if the fuel is indeed the problem with the car.

You never know, you might have been the one bloke who had the last tank out of it before it got its weekly refill, and have a car that's sensitive enough to pick up the difference.

Oh and all this talk with knock sensors and such meaning the car 'pick's up' better fuel, just fill it with whatever the manufacturer has stuck on the inside of the fuel cap. Even if it has a knock sensor, if the manufacturer recommends 95 octane, beyond any extra detergents, sticking 98 in wont make any difference. The car will only pink/knock, and thus make any adjustment if it's received fuel worse than it is expecting, there isn't some magic sensor that can tell whether it's 95 or 98.

If the manufacturer recommends 98 with a minumum of 95, then it's mapped to 98 Octane and that's what you should use. If you fill it with 95 then you're relying on the ECU's engine protection strategy to avoid any damage. Perhaps an acceptable risk in a normally aspirated car, but I would never fill a forced induction car with anything less than manufacturer's recommendation unless it was an emergency

Andyuk911

Original Poster:

1,959 posts

176 months

Monday 30th November 2009
quotequote all
Indeed, the latest Clio 1.2 TCE Turbo has a sticker on the inside of the fuel cap 95 and 98 ...