External door, hinge positions?

External door, hinge positions?

Author
Discussion

toxicnerve

Original Poster:

24,908 posts

148 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
Gents,

I've got a refurbished door that is going to replace the rubbish UPVC jobbie that is currently my front door.

My question is, how should the hinges be positioned?

I've done some digging on the 'net and I'm struggling to find anything conclusive (maybe my Google-Fu is not up to par). Some seem to be suggesting 6in from the top and 9in from the bottom. What about the middle hinge? Should that be smack bang in the centre of the door or offset?

Any help would be much appreciated.

EDIT:

Bit more Googling reveals that 7in from the top, 11in from the bottom and the middle equally between the two seem to be the norm. If someone could confirm that would be much appreciated.

Edited by toxicnerve on Friday 17th August 11:17

JR

12,304 posts

229 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
FWIW structurally the middle hinge should be a lot nearer the top. How important it is depends on the strength of the wood/base material, length and strength of screws, weight of door etc.

wolf1

2,982 posts

221 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
I always put them 6 inches to the tip of the hinge top and bottom and one smack bang in the middle.

RC1

3,997 posts

190 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
JR said:
FWIW structurally the middle hinge should be a lot nearer the top. How important it is depends on the strength of the wood/base material, length and strength of screws, weight of door etc.
thats interesting but ive never seen it in practice. if it were needed then why not put 4 hinges at least to retain the symmetry at not lose any of the structural integrity?

toxicnerve

Original Poster:

24,908 posts

148 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
RC1 said:
JR said:
FWIW structurally the middle hinge should be a lot nearer the top. How important it is depends on the strength of the wood/base material, length and strength of screws, weight of door etc.
thats interesting but ive never seen it in practice. if it were needed then why not put 4 hinges at least to retain the symmetry at not lose any of the structural integrity?
I was just thinking that. Why not just go 7in from the top, 11in from the bottom and then two spaced equally between the two...

mk1fan

9,937 posts

196 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
Must be a heavy front door to need four hinges.

RC1

3,997 posts

190 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
Or a very tall frame

Personally I'd slap one in the mid then the others eqidistant between mid hinge and top and bottom edges of the door

toxicnerve

Original Poster:

24,908 posts

148 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
It's nothing special, standard front door sort of size (32in x 80in or thereabouts). However, it is quite heavy. I can just about lift the bugger (due to size/shape/weight/lack of strength).

I think 4 hinges would probably be overkill but due to the weight of it I will definitely be putting 3 on it.

The reason for offsetting them slightly is that the optical illusion created when look at the door when stood next to it makes it look odd if you have them equidistant, at least that is what most information I can find about this issue seems to be saying.

Apparently 7in from the top and 11in from the bottom is the common practice with the mid halfway between the two. I'm cool with that. I think the hinges we bought was a pack of 3 so I'll just go with 3 for now.

No rush yet as it's not ready to be hung. My Sikkens Woodstain is still on order so it will be a while yet. If anyone else wants to chime in it would be much appreciated.

Cheers,

tn

cahami

1,233 posts

177 months

Friday 17th August 2012
quotequote all
6 and 9 is what i allways do middle one bang in the centre of the door, If the door is heavy then lower one at 9 top at 6 third one at about 6 inches below that.

tim0409

3,216 posts

130 months

Saturday 18th August 2012
quotequote all
Interesting thread as I was looking at some heavy internal doors in a building the other day (would imagine they were supplied as doorsets) and the middle hinge was much closer to the top. Not sure why, but they must think this is the best position for a heavy door...?

astroarcadia

1,669 posts

171 months

Saturday 18th August 2012
quotequote all
Hinge positions are determined by the hinge manufacturer and relate to the load they carry. The Hinges you buy should have some paperwork giving their own recommended positions.

GRADE 7 - For use on 30 min fire doors & 50 kg in weight <<<<--------would be my choice for your application.
GRADE 11 - For use on 30 minute & 60 minute fire doors & 60kg in weight
GRADE 13 - For use on 30, 60 & 120 minute fire doors & up to 75 kg in weight

This is advice for fire and escape doors. Although you are talking about a domestic external door I would still apply these measurements:

One hinge shall be positioned on the centre line of the door height the other two hinges being at 770 mm either side of the centre hinge. This hinge layout gives stability to the door. With fire-resisting doors becoming heavier there is a practice to fit two hinges at the top of the door with the third hinge at the bottom of the door. With this configuration the hinges are positioned as follows; centre line of the top and bottom hinge 250 mm from the top and bottom edge of the door, the centre line of the third hinge is 200 mm from the centre line of the top hinge. I personally don't like this 2 and 1 configuration and always fit one on the centre line unless otherwise specified.

For doors heavier than 160 kg or exceeding 2000 mm in height and 1000 mm in width a recommendation from the hinge manufacturer should be obtained.

HTH



Edited by astroarcadia on Saturday 18th August 08:16

Engineer1

10,486 posts

180 months

Saturday 18th August 2012
quotequote all
Isn't the spacing of hinges an attempt to make them look equally spaced when looked at from a height of 5'5" to 6' i.e. to play with perspective?

Kimmy

73 posts

173 months

Saturday 18th August 2012
quotequote all
I'm a qualified chippy, and I was taught 6in from top of door to the start of the hinge and 9in from the bottom off the door to the start of the hinge.

Then depending on how heavy the door is you can add another one or even two if its really heavy. But for a front door I would suggest 3 hinges. I have a solid oak front door and that's hung using this formula and the third hinge being centre of the other two hinges.

If you had a really heavy door you would normally put two or even three hinges nearer the top to support the weight of the door. But like I said 3 will be enough for your front door I would have thought. It's not a written rule, but this is how I was taught at college and I've stuck with it ever since.

Kimmy

toxicnerve

Original Poster:

24,908 posts

148 months

Saturday 18th August 2012
quotequote all
Cheers fellas!

I'll check the paperwork that came with the hinges and proceed from there (taking onboard advice given here). Much appreciate the help.

Cheers,

tn

Piersman2

6,254 posts

170 months

Saturday 18th August 2012
quotequote all
Strangely enough I was in an office in Germany this week and randomly noted that the big doors into the meeting rooms had two big hinges right up close to the top of the door, and one down at the bottom.

Made sense really as the majority of the pulling forces on a door as it swings would be at the top.

Then I saw this thread. Ain't life just full of coincidences.

For the record, when I've hung doors I've used the 6 and 9 rule, and if a 3rd hinge is required I've just stuck it in the middle of the two.

maxwonga

4 posts

132 months

Monday 3rd March 2014
quotequote all
One for the melting pot, what about a stable door?

was thinking 6" top and bottom of upper section of door and 6 and 9 for bottom! or hinge lined up with bottom of top rail and top of bottom rail, if that makes sense