RE: David Brown teases 'highly tuned' Mini Remastered

RE: David Brown teases 'highly tuned' Mini Remastered

Monday 9th September

David Brown Oselli Mini gets over 100hp | Update

Performance enhanced Mini Remastered targets driving enthusiasts with an optional two-seat version



David Brown has confirmed that its new Oselli Edition Mini will have more than 100hp from a tuned-up 1.4-litre engine. The Stage 3 spec four-pot offers a 40 per cent on the original A-series motor, and coupled to a five-speed manual gearbox, it looks well equipped (at least on paper) to win over anyone unconvinced by David Brown’s 'Day Tripper' Mini Remastered.

The firm’s latest handcrafted model, which arrives 60 years after the original Mini launched, has been co-developed with classic car specialist Oselli to appeal to driving enthusiasts. Its transformation involves more than just stripes and 13-inch Enkie alloys; buyers can upgrade to a two-seat version that places bucket seats and harnesses up front, and ditches the rear bench for a roll cage in the back.

This uprated Oselli Edition also gets different suspension and higher-spec tyres, along with black trim in place of chrome, black wheel arches and the model build number sprayed onto its grille – like a 1960s racer. The finished car looks brilliant, and the specs do look pleasingly like a modern interpretation of the much-loved Cooper formula.

But there is, of course, a catch: the price. The four-seat Oselli Edition costs Β£117,600 and the upgraded two-seater costs Β£129,600. Just 60 are to be made, so don’t expect to see one at a track day anytime soon…

Original story - 27.09.2019


David Brown is perhaps most noteworthy as the creator of the DB5-mimicking Speedback GT, but the company has also been in the business of resto-modding Minis for over two years now. Most recently it launched the convertible 'Day Tripper', a car variously described by PHers as being "an overpriced piece of fluff", "a total shocker" and "just horrible". Perhaps this next one will be a little more up our street, though.

There is one big reason to be optimistic, namely that classic car firm Oselli is involved; the dealership and service centre also boasting a well-regarded restoration business. In fact, the company began in 1962, finding additional performance beneath the bonnets of A-series cars by porting and flowing their cylinder heads, fitting larger valve heads and increasing engine capacity.


All 60 examples of the limited-run David Brown machine will bear Oselli-enhanced engines, as well as other performance-focussed upgrades, resulting in a "high-performance version of Mini Remastered". The cars will also be available in a number of bespoke colour combinations, all of which will be available with the option of matching helmets and race suits, underlining the "highly-tuned" model's commitment to its racing pedigree.

"We are extremely excited to announce this pioneering new partnership with Oselli," said David Brown, company founder and CEO. "We are experts in car design and engineering, while Oselli add to our combined knowledge as long-term specialists in honing race car performance. The classic Mini has a rich racing heritage and our new car, to be revealed in full soon, gives customers yet another reason to want to own a Mini Remastered now that we are also catering for the performance market."

Interested customers won't have long to wait to see more than the shadowy renders provided here, with the car set to be revealed in full at this September's Goodwood Revival. Of course, doing so invites direct comparison with a certain company which has already been building race-proven performance Minis for a number of years. And while Swiftune's products are hardly cheap at between Β£50-60,000, they'll likely still cost considerably less than Brown's creation if previous prices are anything to go by. No pressure then.


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Author
Discussion

wab172uk

Original Poster:

1,392 posts

173 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Nice if you're rich enough to buy one as a spur of the moment thing for a laugh.

888mattd

2 posts

6 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Swiftune are the best

Miserablegit

795 posts

55 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Yes my money would go to Swiftune if only to see Nick Swift cry as I asked for a bit of sound deadening to be installed.

Funk

20,648 posts

155 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Holy bevelled edges, I'd forgotten what an absolute gopper that DB5-a-like was. It's remarkable in that it manages to look ugly from EVERY angle, not just one or two.

I'd rather you'd reminded me I'd lost 'The Game' than see that thing again.

85Carrera

2,013 posts

183 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Does anyone actually buy the overpriced tat this lot produce?

As above, if I wanted an expensive classic mini, I’d get one done properly by swiftune.

n3il123

1,630 posts

159 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Funk said:
Holy bevelled edges, I'd forgotten what an absolute gopper that DB5-a-like was. It's remarkable in that it manages to look ugly from EVERY angle, not just one or two.

I'd rather you'd reminded me I'd lost 'The Game' than see that thing again.
tt smile

P5BNij

4,161 posts

52 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
The 'Mk1 front end on a later Mini shell' thing has been done to death, but if you really want a proper poshed up Mini with the right period looks you might as well spend the time and money looking for a genuine Radford or Wood & Pickett one from the '60s and early '70s which will be cheaper than the DB thing, even if you find one that needs restoring.




Filibuster

1,179 posts

161 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
It's the same thing as with the Singer 911.
Hands down a very pretty, very cool, greatly engineered car.
Building something like this is expensive. And while you could build 90% of that car yourself in your garage for half the cost, it wouldn't be much cheaper to get it to the full 100%, once you factor in your time.

Sure, there are some very well known specialist out there who have great knowledge of building racing cars (this is true for the 911's as well as the mini's).
But this appeals to the people who want to ready made/developed car that has nice interior touches and your aluminium indicator stalks, etc.

Sure it is expensive, but it is built by a company that has nice brochures, showrooms, etc. Somebody has to pay for this too.
I think considering all this and factor in development, the price is alright.

I would love one these !!
And while we are at it, also a Singer 911 ... (hmmm.... or one of those Ateliers Diva Porsches ....)
And an Eagle E-Type roadster .....

WJNB

2,011 posts

107 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
85Carrera said:
Does anyone actually buy the overpriced tat this lot produce?

As above, if I wanted an expensive classic mini, I’d get one done properly by swiftune.
I'm bored with the entire subject especially when the poncy snobby word 'continuation' is used.

soad

30,393 posts

122 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
WJNB said:
I'm bored with the entire subject especially when the poncy snobby word 'continuation' is used.
You won’t like a Superformance Shelby Daytona Coupe then...

dunnoreally

306 posts

54 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Just one of many answers to the question "what if you can easily afford a full-size luxury car, but would prefer to drive something smaller because you live in a city", I think. It's easy to compare it to Eagles and Singers, but I wonder if it's natural rival isn't still the Cygnet.

Electro1980

292 posts

85 months

Tuesday 27th August
quotequote all
Funk said:
Holy bevelled edges, I'd forgotten what an absolute gopper that DB5-a-like was. It's remarkable in that it manages to look ugly from EVERY angle, not just one or two.

I'd rather you'd reminded me I'd lost 'The Game' than see that thing again.
fk you for reminding me of both of those things!

The DB5 just shows why 1960s design was of its time. At first glance the car looks good, and then you notice that it has modern curves and softened edges brought on by CAD and modern design language and then it starts to look odd. It’s a bit like the uncanny valley effect. It just looks odd and ugly and weird.

sleepera6

4,742 posts

43 months

Wednesday 28th August
quotequote all
n3il123 said:
tt smile
Oh dear, did he hit a nerve there

bakerstreet

4,200 posts

111 months

Wednesday 28th August
quotequote all
I spent a happy four years in the Mini scene and I have never heard of Oselli as an engine builder. The general rule of thumb was MED or Swiftune for great engines.


Grahamdub

3,006 posts

89 months

Wednesday 28th August
quotequote all
bakerstreet said:
I spent a happy four years in the Mini scene and I have never heard of Oselli as an engine builder. The general rule of thumb was MED or Swiftune for great engines.
Really ? Oselli have been round for years.

Pothole

27,501 posts

228 months

Wednesday 28th August
quotequote all
Grahamdub said:
bakerstreet said:
I spent a happy four years in the Mini scene and I have never heard of Oselli as an engine builder. The general rule of thumb was MED or Swiftune for great engines.
Really ? Oselli have been round for years.
Almost 6 decades

fluff piece above said:
In fact, the company began in 1962, finding additional performance beneath the bonnets of A-series cars by porting and flowing their cylinder heads, fitting larger valve heads and increasing engine capacity.

Funk

20,648 posts

155 months

Thursday 29th August
quotequote all
sleepera6 said:
n3il123 said:
tt smile
Oh dear, did he hit a nerve there
No, I just reminded him he'd lost The Game.

And now everyone else has again too.

Bahnstormer

890 posts

192 months

Friday 30th August
quotequote all
The DB5'esque car was XK8-based, and some incredible price. Who buys these ? , and why aren't they buying a classic mini ?

timberman

477 posts

161 months

Sunday 1st September
quotequote all
Grahamdub said:
Really ? Oselli have been round for years.
Back in the early 80's a friend bought the original Oselli 230s 3.1 capri they built that was featured in a magazine at the time,
haven't seen him for years so don't know if he's still got it, but a great car all the same.


Venturist

2,782 posts

141 months

Sunday 1st September
quotequote all
Bahnstormer said:
The DB5'esque car was XK8-based, and some incredible price. Who buys these ? , and why aren't they buying a classic mini ?
Because a classic mini is, at best, an old car that’s been restored. This (you can order as if it) is a brand new car. It’s not for me, but I can 100% see the appeal.

If you’re a very wealthy individual and you’ve always thought minis were cool but could never be doing with the faff, this is the way to do it.
The alternative is either:
- choosing a preowned original car that was restored and customised to someone else’s preferences;
- managing a restoration on an original car so it IS to your preferences, including tracking down all the suitable businesses to do the work for you, booking it in with them, getting it transported from place to place, and if anything’s wrong with it you have to go back to them and hope they’ll not be arsey about rectifying their work.

With the David Brown car you can say “looks great, I’ll have it in red with white stripes and Apple CarPlay” and X months later there you go, and it should have a worthwhile warranty route for any problems & should be pretty bulletproof anyway. It makes sense, if you’re someone who doesn’t need to bother with looking at prices.