RE: British firm offers EV conversions to Rolls owners

RE: British firm offers EV conversions to Rolls owners

Friday 11th October

British firm offers EV conversions to Rolls owners

Guilty about the carbon footprint of your classic car? Silverstone-based Lunaz has a solution



A new British company has launched an EV conversion service for iconic classic cars, replacing their original oily bits with high-powered battery-electric hardware. The Silverstone-based startup is developing three models for market, a 1961 Rolls-Royce Phantom V, 1953 Jaguar XK120 and 1956 Rolls-Royce Cloud, the first examples of each currently undergoing transformations in the workshop.

While the work is undoubtedly substantial, Lunaz stresses that it’s being careful to complement each car’s original character, factoring weight distribution into the earliest CAD models to ensure similar handling balance. Overall performance will be enhanced with the conversions, thanks to the instantaneous torque on offer. Engineers have given the lighter XK120 an 80kWh battery pack, while the much heavier Phantom V requires a 120kWh alternative. The former is on course to produce 375hp and 516lb ft of torque, more than doubling its original statistics.


The work goes beyond the powertrain transplant, of course, with Lunaz also offering bespoke restoration to all other components and modern additions such as satnav and WiFi. The firm’s engineers – some of which have come from Aston Martin, Ferrari and Formula 1  – will modernise chassis components and fit regenerative braking hardware, while a fast-charging plug will be placed where the fuel filler used to be. But the visible changes will be in keeping with the original car’s appearance, as illustrated by the pictured models, which for the most part look completely standard and original.

Still, nobody would be silly enough to deny that such transformations will not sit well with everyone – particularly dedicated fans of the originals. The Jaguar’s straight-six engine in particular has an ever-lasting legacy that stretches to this day, so the process of removing it does rather feel like replacing a village church spire with a mobile phone mast. But Lunaz makes a compelling argument for its case, stating that it is not targeting longstanding owners of these legendary models, but rather enthusiasts who are seeking a different type of experience.


A spokesman told PH that the company’s products are for those wanting β€œreliable, zero-emission running” combined with the iconic design of a classic car, and that it expects to β€œbring new people to classic car ownership”. You can’t really argue with that. And unlike Jaguar and the customers of its factory-run EV conversions (which include the E-Type Zero), Lunaz doesn’t think buyers of its electric classics will ever want to return their cars to petrol power, illustrating the different target market – although such a task is theoretically possible if all the bits are kept.

So how much will this service set you back? Prices will be entirely unique per vehicle due to the customisation on offer, but the least amount of cash you’d need to hand over for one of these cars is Β£350,000. Which is about the same price for a brand-new Phantom VIII. But as far as style, grace and coolness is concerned, this old stuff has that car beat one thousand times over. That Lunaz’s conversion means they can now be driven into city centres the world over and not require constant TLC for ageing mechanical parts will no doubt appeal to some. Ensuring the sight of such cars on the road for future generations is also to be welcomed. Right?


Find a Rolls-Royce here










Author
Discussion

Dale487

Original Poster:

1,035 posts

69 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
The Rolls Royces don't bother me but the Jaguar does.

samoht

990 posts

92 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all

Electric power seems entirely in keeping with the Rolls ethos - it's not about the sound of the engine or top-end power; the loudest noise should come from the clock, and torque should arrive smoothly from just off idle to ensure performance is always 'sufficient'. As long as some working examples with the original engines are kept, others going electric seems entirely reasonable to me.

The Jag, on the other hand, is a sports car where the experience of the engine is a key element. An electric XK120 makes no sense to me.

flacko

44 posts

1 month

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Dale487 said:
The Rolls Royces don't bother me but the Jaguar does.
it seems very wrong doesnt it

Exige77

3,861 posts

137 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
These cars will do minimal mileage each year.

Converting them to an EV will greatly increase their carbon footprint.

It’s all for appearances.

ZOLLAR

19,764 posts

119 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
samoht said:
Electric power seems entirely in keeping with the Rolls ethos - it's not about the sound of the engine or top-end power; the loudest noise should come from the clock, and torque should arrive smoothly from just off idle to ensure performance is always 'sufficient'. As long as some working examples with the original engines are kept, others going electric seems entirely reasonable to me.

The Jag, on the other hand, is a sports car where the experience of the engine is a key element. An electric XK120 makes no sense to me.
Totally agree, I was a bit put off by the suggestion they could add sat nav and wifi, step too far in a classic Rolls IMO.

ducnick

943 posts

189 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Whilst the XK leaves me cold, I do rather like the Rolls idea. If I were a business fat cat in the market for a £350k limo to ferry me between business meetings and my private jet, I would go with one of these rather than a new Rolls/Bentley/Merc etc

gweaver

594 posts

104 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Why did they park it in an oil seed rape field?

Dave Hedgehog

11,391 posts

150 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
lovely idea but ouch at the price

Jimbo.

3,478 posts

135 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Is an EV XK a bad thing, remembering the whole grace, space, pace thing of Jaguar?

thelostboy

3,530 posts

171 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Exige77 said:
These cars will do minimal mileage each year.

Converting them to an EV will greatly increase their carbon footprint.

It’s all for appearances.
But wouldn't you end up using your old Rolls far more if it was modernised? I guess in theory electric power would be far more reliable.

This is an important element of owning classics. I love the idea of one, but am talented enough to maintain one and would be worried I'd just be on the phone to the AA on every long drive (if they even cover classics...).

I do agree though, the XK is an odd choice. A Rolls, Bentley or other car of that ilk makes far more sense. Let's face it, in 30 years time, it might be a necessity if we wish to drive these cars legally on the road.

richs2891

782 posts

199 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Exige77 said:
These cars will do minimal mileage each year.

Converting them to an EV will greatly increase their carbon footprint.

It’s all for appearances.
Whole heartily agree with this, would be better to convert cars / lorries that pollute more that worrying about cars that probably do less than 5K miles a year

Dale487

Original Poster:

1,035 posts

69 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
samoht said:
Electric power seems entirely in keeping with the Rolls ethos - it's not about the sound of the engine or top-end power; the loudest noise should come from the clock, and torque should arrive smoothly from just off idle to ensure performance is always 'sufficient'. As long as some working examples with the original engines are kept, others going electric seems entirely reasonable to me.

The Jag, on the other hand, is a sports car where the experience of the engine is a key element. An electric XK120 makes no sense to me.
Thanks for articulating my feelings better than I managed.

Dale487

Original Poster:

1,035 posts

69 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
flacko said:
Dale487 said:
The Rolls Royces don't bother me but the Jaguar does.
it seems very wrong doesnt it
samoht above puts this rather well.

IJWS15

184 posts

31 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
After conversion they are no longer classics . .

It is all about making money, nothing to do with saving the environment.

If I owned any of the above would I convert them - no, but I might get a Tesla, or a diesel, for the higher mileage journeys.

dvb70

82 posts

53 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Agree with the general sentiments. It's perfect for a Rolls Royce as to me they have never been about the engine but about insulating the occupants from the outside world. To do it to an XK though is something else. I can't imagine who the person is who would want an XK but not care about the characteristics of the XK engine and sound.

Edited by dvb70 on Thursday 10th October 13:34

BVB

667 posts

99 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all

How very English. Superb.

Nerdherder

1,551 posts

43 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
Dale487 said:
The Rolls Royces don't bother me but the Jaguar does.
Exactly!

Teddy Lop

1,717 posts

13 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
thelostboy said:
Exige77 said:
These cars will do minimal mileage each year.

Converting them to an EV will greatly increase their carbon footprint.

It’s all for appearances.
But wouldn't you end up using your old Rolls far more if it was modernised? I guess in theory electric power would be far more reliable.

This is an important element of owning classics. I love the idea of one, but am talented enough to maintain one and would be worried I'd just be on the phone to the AA on every long drive (if they even cover classics...).

I do agree though, the XK is an odd choice. A Rolls, Bentley or other car of that ilk makes far more sense. Let's face it, in 30 years time, it might be a necessity if we wish to drive these cars legally on the road.
depends if it's a full on restomod being undertaken or just an electric power train - for the price you'd hope the former!

Would a full restomod make it a q plate though?

Oh, with everyone else on the appropiateness verdict of fine for a rolls, but just kinda wr0ng in the jag

5490

1,819 posts

44 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
This is the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen.

How much co2 was released by manufacturing these electric packs? Tonnes of it.

A classic car is the last thing that needs to be changed - people do so few miles in them and they're typically owned by people who own more than one, so they're not being used that often.

The ironic thing is, the most environmentally friendly thing to do is leave the petrol engine in.

what bks about using it in London and more use out of it.

Complete waste of time, energy and money.

AMGSee55

159 posts

48 months

Thursday 10th October
quotequote all
The reference to city centre driving is redundant as far as London is concerned. Rolls, Jags etc of that era are all in the ‘historic’ taxation class and hence dodge the ULEZ charges anyway.