RE: Aston pitches new Zagato for £6m - a pair

RE: Aston pitches new Zagato for £6m - a pair

Wednesday 10th April

Aston pitches new Zagato pair for £6m: Update

Aston Martin Works swings into gear as DB4 GT Zagato Continuation production begins



Having revealed renderings of its forthcoming DBS GT Zagato a couple of weeks ago, Aston Martin has today announced the (re)commencement of DB4 GT Zagato production, bringing the £6 million pair one step closer to reality.

Just 19 of the Continuation classics will be constructed at Aston Martin Works' Newport Pagnell headquarters, a facility which the company describes as now being "the largest, best equipped and most knowledgeable Aston Martin restoration centre in the world."


Its employees will use a combination of modern production systems, like a digital body buck and artisanal coachbuilding skills - such as hand-finished body panels - to "optimise" the build process for the 21st Century. The 'new' cars will wear those aluminium panels over a lightweight tubular-frame chassis and be powered by a version of their forebears' Tadek Marek-designed straight-six engine, sending around 380hp to the rear wheels via a four-speed manual transmission and limited-slip differential.

When complete, the Continuation cars will join the similarly-positioned DB4 GT in rewriting/tarnishing/celebrating (delete as appropriate) Aston's history, before being joined next year by its modern DBS-based Zagato counterpart and DB5 'Goldfinger' sibling.

Speaking about the project Paul Spires, President of Aston Martin Works, said: "We are bringing all of our hand-craftsmanship and expertise to bear in building these nineteen Continuation cars, sympathetically incorporating the very latest engineering advancements and performance enhancements, but remaining true to the purity and authenticity of the original design. After the unprecedented success of the DB4 GT Continuation cars, we are once again bringing to life in the 21st Century the stuff of Aston Martin folklore."





Original story - 23.03.19

You may have heard about Aston Martin’s intention to float on the stock market before the end of the year. The firm is optimistically valued at around £5 billion, and recently posted half-yearly profits of £42 million, thanks in no small part to the fledgling success of its Second Century strategy.

While that plan focuses on increasing sales of the Vantage, DB11 and new DBS in emerging markets, as well as rejuvenating Lagonda as a luxury EV manufacturer, there are other strings to Aston’s bow. Foremost among them is Aston Martin Works, which has in recent times been responsible for the £1.5 million DB4 GT Continuations and the £2.75 million ‘Goldfinger’ DB5s and intends to embark on one such project per year henceforth. Stamping out curvaceous retro body panels is, Gaydon has discovered, as good as printing cold hard cash.


Good thing, then, that 2019 happens to be the one hundredth anniversary of Italian coachbuilder extraordinaire and long-time Aston collaborator, Zagato. What better opportunity to re-release a car which is not only arguably the most successful convergence of the two brand’s expertise, but which also set an auction record when an original example sold for £10,081,500 just a few months ago.

The DB4 GT Zagato Continuation will be built by Aston Martin Works at Newport Pagnell, the same location which birthed the original cars. Of course, this isn’t the first time that the model has been brought back from the dead; four ‘Sanction II’ cars were built on unused chassis numbers in 1988 and a further two ‘Sanction III’ cars were made in 2000 using the leftover body shells from the Sanction II run.


Those cars were based on existing DB4 GTs, though, with bodies handcrafted in Italy by Zagato themselves. The 19 Continuations, on the other hand, are said to be “completely authentic and meticulously crafted cars that are true to those original Zagato-bodied DB4 GTs“ while also “sympathetically incorporating the very latest engineering advancements and performance enhancements.” They won’t be road legal, either. But wait, there’s more. Order now and Aston will send you not one, but two Zagato special editions! That’s because the DB4 GT Zagato can’t be bought alone; no, it comes as part of a very special duo of cars intended to bookend the brands’ shared history.

Alongside the DB4 announcement also comes news of 19 DBS GT Zagatos. Based on the new DBS (obviously), they will feature “a fresh interpretation of the iconic double-bubble roof... a striking front grille treatment and a dramatically truncated tail.” They will also be the rarest of all modern-era Aston Martin Zagatos, eclipsing the 28 Vanquish Zagato Speedsters announced last year. Together, the new pair will form a product which Aston Chief Creative Officer Marek Reichman describes as embodying Aston Martin and Zagato’s “uniquely dynamic union.” How Superleggera will feel about that we can only guess, what with it being that Italian coach builder’s name which currently adorns the DBS’s bonnet.  


The DBZ Century Collection, as the two will be cumulatively known, will be priced at (deep breath now) £6 million plus taxes, which makes the £525,000 asked for each of the 99 Vanquish Zagato Coupes seem like a snip. Deliveries of the DB4 are set to begin at the end of 2019, with owners having to keep themselves occupied with their new toy for an entire year before DBS deliveries start at the end of 2020.

When asked whether customers would be obligated to ensure the cars remained together if sold on, an Aston spokesperson replied that, “they will be initially sold as a pair and then after that any agreement in place with our customers is strictly confidential.” If you’re hoping to pick up a DBS Zagato on its own, then, there may be hope yet.

Author
Discussion

Robert-nszl1

Original Poster:

353 posts

28 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
Utterly beautiful cars, and I certainly don't begrudge Aston et al from exploiting their history, especially if it means the older manufacturing and crafting techniques are sustained and taught to a new generation of craftsmen/ women. But as many others have said in previous threads about similar creations, the fact that these aren't road legal is such a shame. I don't ascribe to the idea that cars are just works of art, they are there to be driven. Yes these can be transported to a circuit, but the basis of ownership is just so limited. It's a shame there can't be some flexibility around the law that allows these cars to driven properly.

TooMany2cvs

29,008 posts

66 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
The article said:
...a very special duo of cars intended to bookend the brands’ shared history.
"Bookend"? As in the start and finish?

The DB4 might have started it off, but the DB5 definitely didn't wrap it up... Apart from the "Rowan Atkinson" V8 Vantage Zag in the 80s, Didn't they do a V12Zag to celebrate 50yrs? And a DB7Zag?

User33678888

1,129 posts

77 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
TooMany2cvs said:
The article said:
...a very special duo of cars intended to bookend the brands’ shared history.
"Bookend"? As in the start and finish?

The DB4 might have started it off, but the DB5 definitely didn't wrap it up... Apart from the "Rowan Atkinson" V8 Vantage Zag in the 80s, Didn't they do a V12Zag to celebrate 50yrs? And a DB7Zag?
You've misread DBS as DB5

TooMany2cvs

29,008 posts

66 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
User33678888 said:
You've misread DBS as DB5
D'oh. More tea needed.

cookie1600

1,111 posts

101 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
Lovely cars and I'm sure all those currently being discussed here have been snapped up. For some of the rest of us (well, not by any means all of us!) this seems like a great way of achieving both dreams:







http://www.beautifullife.info/automotive-design/as...

Still not cheap I bet, but the best of both worlds?
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cybersimon

194 posts

109 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
. . . news of 19 DBS GT Zagatos.

Hmm just 19, this sounds like a sound investment.

Do they promise not to do any continuation models that might devalue the 'originals'?

Plate spinner

13,048 posts

140 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
Robert-nszl1 said:
Utterly beautiful cars, and I certainly don't begrudge Aston et al from exploiting their history, especially if it means the older manufacturing and crafting techniques are sustained and taught to a new generation of craftsmen/ women. But as many others have said in previous threads about similar creations, the fact that these aren't road legal is such a shame. I don't ascribe to the idea that cars are just works of art, they are there to be driven. Yes these can be transported to a circuit, but the basis of ownership is just so limited. It's a shame there can't be some flexibility around the law that allows these cars to driven properly.
Totally agree. Seems such a shame.

greyarea

20 posts

90 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
I'm a little confused by the not road legal thing. Can't they be registered using IVA? I've just taken delivery of a CCM Spitfire Scrambler that has been built brand new and registered using MSVA even though it would not conform to any of the current standards. Surely these would be eligible for the car equivalent even if the new owner had to do it themselves?

TooMany2cvs

29,008 posts

66 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
greyarea said:
I'm a little confused by the not road legal thing. Can't they be registered using IVA?
No, because it's simply nowhere near meeting the standards for a new-build car.

greyarea said:
I've just taken delivery of a CCM Spitfire Scrambler that has been built brand new and registered using MSVA even though it would not conform to any of the current standards.
There's lots of little get-outs for "off-road-style" bikes.

Gus265

160 posts

73 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
Robert-nszl1 said:
But as many others have said in previous threads about similar creations, the fact that these aren't road legal is such a shame. I don't ascribe to the idea that cars are just works of art, they are there to be driven. Yes these can be transported to a circuit, but the basis of ownership is just so limited. It's a shame there can't be some flexibility around the law that allows these cars to driven properly.
I totally agree - not being able to drive these on the road is a massive turn off (no matter how much money you have). Can you even enter it in the Revival? Presumably not. So I really can't see the attraction of owning it. Hammond drove that XKSS on the roads in Europe - how did he manage that?

greyarea

20 posts

90 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
TooMany2cvs said:
There's lots of little get-outs for "off-road-style" bikes.
Not all versions of the Spitfire are "off-road-style" and they are all road legal. I guess the single concession CCM have made is that the engine meets current emission standards, even though it is card fed.

How do kit cars get round it or do they need a modern engine if being built new? Surely a Caterham can't meet modern crash standards for homologation purposes.

Edited by greyarea on Wednesday 19th September 11:21

cookie1600

1,111 posts

101 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
TooMany2cvs said:
greyarea said:
I'm a little confused by the not road legal thing. Can't they be registered using IVA?
No, because it's simply nowhere near meeting the standards for a new-build car.
So the dichotomy here is it's perfectly acceptable to take your genuine DB4 Zagato on the road anywhere, now without even having an annual MOT, but a perfect replica, (sorry continuation) built by the same manufacturer, complete in every detail or maybe even with improved safety features isn't allowed? Governmental madness!

I could run over, or crash into, any amount of people in the original this afternoon and providing it wasn't wilful or negligent, it would still be 'legal' even though I wouldn't have had to have an annual check of it's road-worthiness......

Time to create an MOT test or sub IVA test that reflects the real world. Or are we on the way to the Government banning all cars from the road that are say over 30 years old or more?

TooMany2cvs

29,008 posts

66 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
greyarea said:
How do kit cars get round it or do they need a modern engine if being built new?
Emissions go on the age of engine - and cars built from used parts don't get registered as brand new.

greyarea said:
Surely a Caterham can't meet modern crash standards for homologation purposes.
Some type approval changes get required of vehicles already in production, others don't. Crash standards are mostly marketing rather than legislation.

Raudus42

151 posts

73 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
The word is 'obliged' not 'obligated'...this isn't America.

greyarea

20 posts

90 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
TooMany2cvs said:
Some type approval changes get required of vehicles already in production, others don't. Crash standards are mostly marketing rather than legislation.
Must admit I thought driver airbags were mandatory in the UK now due to all the fuss that was made about fitting them to some vehicles in recent times (e.g. LR Defender) but turns out they aren't. Unlike ABS which along with emissions is the most likely reason these continuation cars are not road legal I would suppose.

williamp

16,388 posts

213 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
cybersimon said:
. . . news of 19 DBS GT Zagatos.

Hmm just 19, this sounds like a sound investment.

Do they promise not to do any continuation models that might devalue the 'originals'?
Well, handily the chassis numbers start at 100000001 so yes, there are a few un-used chassis numbers they could use in the near future. How many commemorative coins do the royal mint make again????

TooMany2cvs

29,008 posts

66 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
greyarea said:
Must admit I thought driver airbags were mandatory in the UK now due to all the fuss that was made about fitting them to some vehicles in recent times (e.g. LR Defender)
There was a lot of bks over that - emissions, airbags, whatever. The real reason was a single, simple one. It was massively expensive to build, and unprofitable.

greyarea

20 posts

90 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
TooMany2cvs said:
There was a lot of bks over that - emissions, airbags, whatever. The real reason was a single, simple one. It was massively expensive to build, and unprofitable.
Don't think profitability is a problem for Aston Martin in this case biggrin

I'm sure it's been discussed to death in other continuation threads but just interested to know exactly why these cars can't be made road legal if CCM can get away with it for a bike.

Think I might actually read the VOSA guide if I get really bored...

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/governmen...

TooMany2cvs

29,008 posts

66 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
greyarea said:
Don't think profitability is a problem for Aston Martin in this case biggrin
Nooooo...

greyarea said:
Think I might actually read the VOSA guide if I get really bored...

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/governmen...
Add the full tester manual to that list.
Car - https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/governmen...
Bike - https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/governmen...

BTW, apposite user name.

thegreenhell

5,295 posts

159 months

Wednesday 19th September 2018
quotequote all
£1.5m DB4 GT
£3m DB5 Goldfinger
£6m DB4 GT Zagato

I confidently predict that the next car they make in this line will be the £12m DB7 Johnny English Edition.